For the majority of modern history, alimony was a term used to describe the responsibility that a husband had to provide financially for his ex-wife. It was a responsibility that was solely placed on husbands and a right that was solely for wives. In recent years, things have changed. It doesn’t matter if you are a husband or a wife, you may still be required to pay alimony after the divorce or separation, depending on a number of circumstances.

The idea of alimony began centuries ago in England. When it started, divorce was not an option. The only arrangement that spouses who could no longer live together could have was legal separation. Even though the couple was separated, by law the husband would have the responsibility to care for and support his spouse who was still legally his wife. When colonists from Europe made their way to the United States, they brought with them the idea of alimony.

During the early years of American law, divorce had to be one of the two mates fault. Did one of them cheat? Did one of them commit a crime? Or did one of them engage in questionable activities that made divorce a viable option? If the divorce came to an end because the husband did something, then the wife would get alimony.

When interacting with their clients, a modern alimony attorney Orlando FL will explain to the client some of the requirements and limitations to alimony. Alimony could be a temporary thing where one spouse supports the other until the other spouse is able to support themselves via a job or other financial means. Alimony could also be a permanent thing where one spouse supports the other until either spouse dies.

One of the biggest questions that spouses have when it comes to discussing alimony is how much money they will be able to get. Again, the answer to that question varies a great deal depending on the income of the individuals involved, circumstances connect to the divorce, and if there are any children as well as who has custody for those children.